Laminations Be Praised! How the Croissant Came to Be, and Other Crusty Tales

Presented by Sandra Holl, Chef/Partner, Floriole, Chicago

Although the French are known for croissants, they did not invent this globally appealing culinary pleasure. Come join us as one of Chicago’s most celebrated bakers, Sandra Holl, traces the origins of the croissant and other “laminated” pastries and touches on some of the colorful, although not necessarily true, origin stories. Continue reading

“Sustainable” – A Documentary, What’s Ahead for Agriculture?

Presented by Matt Wechsler
Filmmaker, Food Activist

Join us for a discussion and screening of the award-winning documentary, “Sustainable.” Local filmmaker and food activist Matt Wechsler will show highlights from his film. He’ll cover the economic and environmental instability of America’s food system, from the agricultural issues we face — soil loss, water depletion, climate change, pesticide use — to the community of leaders who are determined to fix it. Continue reading

Whoever Said the English Can’t Cook? Cookbooks from 1300 to 1700 Prove Otherwise!

Presented by Sarah Peters Kernan, PhD

The early centuries of cookbook production in England were filled with a dazzling variety of manuscript and printed texts. “Cookeries” from 1300 to 1700 ranged from basic, undecorated texts to lavishly illustrated cookbooks. In her extensive research, Sarah Peters Kernan, PhD, has examined numerous manuscripts and printed cookeries in libraries across the United States and Europe. Continue reading

American Food has a History You Wouldn’t Believe!

Presented by Bruce Kraig, PhD
Author, President Emeritus, Culinary Historians of Chicago
CELEBRATING OUR 25TH YEAR—

On New Year’s Day 1836, President Andrew Jackson received a momentous culinary gift, a humongous cheese, 2 feet thick, 11 feet in circumference, and weighing 1400 pounds. It was created in the summer of 1835 by Col. Thomas S. Meacham, a prosperous dairy farmer with lands near Lake Ontario north of Syracuse New York. The mammoth cheese was sent by boat along the Erie Canal on to Washington. It was a public sensation. James Fenimore Cooper wrote of the same area of New York only two generations before as a wilderness that only gradually was being transformed.

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